The military is weakened by psychiatric drug prescribing and meddling

It’s been reported that the Ministry of Defence is to investigate suicide rates among Iraq and Afghanistan war veterans after it was found that 42 current soldiers were believed to have killed themselves this year.

Whenever suicide rates like this are mentioned in relation to various demographics, it has become commonplace to ask what psychiatric drugs were or are involved in the given situation. Rather than helping a person overcome his or her mental troubles, psychiatric drugs make things worse.

If you search for information that shows a pattern between the suicides and the psychiatric drugs, you find it. To parallel the military suicides, it was reported earlier this year that, since 2016, 1 in 13 soldiers were given antidepressants for conditions ranging from post-traumatic stress to physical injuries.

It’s a modern day tragedy that the military has become weakened by psychiatric drug prescribing and meddling. While casualties usually occur in a combat zone, they are now occurring on home territory, the very place that was supposed to be his or her safe haven.

Soldiers and veterans are therefore urged to become educated on the true dangers of psychiatry and psychiatric drugs. The answer lies in their right to full and honest informed consent.

Our service members need to know there are safe and effective non-psychiatric solutions to the horrors of combat stress, and that these solutions will not subject them to dangerous and toxic treatments that will only send their health spiralling downward.

In 1942, Sir Winston Churchill spoke about psychiatry and its attempt to impose itself upon the military. He said, “I am sure it would be sensible to restrict as much as possible the work of these gentleman, who are capable of doing an immense amount of harm with what may very easily degenerate into charlatanry. The tightest hand should be kept over them, and they should not be allowed to quarter themselves in large numbers upon the Fighting Services at the public expense. There are no doubt easily recognisable cases which may benefit from treatment of this kind, but it is wrong to disturb large numbers of healthy, normal men and women by asking the kind of odd questions in which the psychiatrists specialise.”

It was true in 1942 and it remains true in 2018.


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